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Supporting data for Loik et al. 2017 Wavelength-Selective Solar Photovoltaic Systems: Powering greenhouses for plant growth at the food-energy-water nexus. Earth's Future

Citation

Loik, Michael (2017), Supporting data for Loik et al. 2017 Wavelength-Selective Solar Photovoltaic Systems: Powering greenhouses for plant growth at the food-energy-water nexus. Earth's Future, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.7291/D10T0W

Abstract

Global renewable electricity generation capacity has rapidly increased in the past decade. Increasing the sustainability of electricity generation and the market share of solar photovoltaics (PV) will require continued cost reductions or higher efficiencies. Wavelength-Selective Photovoltaics (WSPVs) combine luminescent solar cell technology with conventional Silicon-based PV, thereby increasing efficiency and lowering the cost of electricity generation. WSPVs absorb some of the blue and green wavelengths of the solar spectrum but transmit the remaining wavelengths that are utilized by photosynthesis. WSPVs are ideal for integrating electricity generation with glasshouse production, but it is not clear how they may affect plant development and physiological processes. The effects of tomato photosynthesis under WSPVs showed a small decrease in water use, whereas there were minimal effects on the number and fresh weight of fruit for a number of commercial species. Although more research is required on the impacts of WSPVs, they are a promising technology for greater integration of distributed electricity generation with food production operations, as building-integrated solar facilities, or as alternative to high-impact PV for energy generation over agricultural or natural ecosystems.