Dash logoUC Santa Cruz logo

Evolutionary Game Theory: Simulations

Citation

Friedman, Daniel; Sinervo, Barry (2015), Evolutionary Game Theory: Simulations, Software, https://doi.org/10.7291/D1MW2X

Abstract

The software examples are all derived in the book by Daniel Friedman and Barry Sinervo, &quot;Evolutionary Games in Natural, Social, and Virtual Worlds&quot;, published by Oxford University Press (2016). These Excel simulations, R workspaces, and mathematica programs are designed to illustrate diverse games that can be developed for one-population games such as Hawk Dove, RPS, Defect-Cooperate-TFT, to two population games such as Baseball (pitchers versus batters) or Buyer-Seller. The Excel games D-C-TFT and Baseball are derived from Joseph E. Harrington&#39;s examples from his book &quot;Games, Strategies, and Decision Making&quot; (Publisher MacMillan, 2009). </p><p> We also develop continuous time versions of several games in the R programming environment, including an r-K strategy game, a two-population buyer-seller game, and several variations on RPS (all discussed in Chapters 1-4 of Friedman and Sinervo, 2016). </p><p> The software repository also includes a cellular automata (written by Morgan Maddren, Barry Sinervo and Daniel Friedman) implemented in the R programming environment. The package is described in Chapter 6 of Friedman and Sinervo (2016). The software requires the R packages vcd and deSolve to run. </p><p> We also include a mathematica version, based on William Sandholm&#39;s Mathematica package Dynamo (2013) of a predator (Naive-Responsive) playing against alternative prey types of Aposematic Model, Batesian Mimic, and Cryptic type, referred to as ABC prey game vs NR Predator. Version 1 of ABC-NR includes the simple version introduced in Chapter 7 of Friedman and Sinervo (2016) as well as the more complex version with additional own population effects for prey. </p><p> Also included in this software repository are diverse examples of RPS games using Sandholm&#39;s mathematica package Dynamo, such as the yeast RPS of Question 6 in Chapter 3, and diverse RPS mating systems found in Chapter 7 of Friedman and Sinervo (2016). </p><p> These examples are intended to spur on the development of projects by students who use the book as a text for a class.

Methods

The spreadsheets and R software implement discrete or continuous time versions of several evolutionary games as described in the Book by Daniel Friedman and Barry Sinervo, &quot;Evolutionary Games in Natural, Social, and Virtual Worlds&quot;, published by Oxford University Press (2016).